Proctor inducted into Millsaps HOF
by Andy Collier
Nov 19, 2013 | 2046 views | 0 0 comments | 36 36 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bolivar Commercial / Special
Don Proctor (25) looks to make a move in basketball action during his playing days at Millsaps. Proctor played shooting guard for the Majors.
Bolivar Commercial / Special Don Proctor (25) looks to make a move in basketball action during his playing days at Millsaps. Proctor played shooting guard for the Majors.
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Millsaps Photo
East Side High School graduate Don Proctor was one of six people inducted in the Millsaps College Sports Hall of Fame on Nov. 2. Proctor played basketball at Millsaps for two years, leading the team to two SCAC Championships in 1995 and 96.
Millsaps Photo East Side High School graduate Don Proctor was one of six people inducted in the Millsaps College Sports Hall of Fame on Nov. 2. Proctor played basketball at Millsaps for two years, leading the team to two SCAC Championships in 1995 and 96.
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Cleveland native and East Side High School graduate Don Proctor earned an honor that very few former college athletes are able to attain.

Proctor, who played basketball as a shooting guard at Millsaps College in Jackson for two years, was inducted into the Millsaps Sports Hall of Fame on Nov. 2. During his time at Millsaps, Proctor was key in guiding the Majors to two Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Men’s Basketball Championships in 1995 and 96. In his 1995-96 campaign, he averaged 19.4 points per game and made 134 out of 188 free throws to earn his way on the All-South Region Team. He also earned first team All-SCAC honors during his career.

Proctor, who graduated from East Side in 1992, played basketball at Mississippi Delta Community College before going to Millsaps.

For Proctor, being inducted into the Hall of Fame is truly a special moment in his life.

“It means a lot to me as far as the time and effort I put into sports and athletics,” Proctor, 39, said. “I started off at Mississippi Delta Community College after graduating from East Side High School in 1992. During that time, I put a lot of time and effort into my skill and doing a lot extra to make myself better.

“At Millsaps, it paid off. I was kind of shocked because it was quite an honor to make it after playing only two years at Millsaps College. That someone goes to a school for just two years and is inducted into the Hall of Fame.”

Millsaps is known over the year for its high academic standards.

Proctor said working harder in the classroom proved to be a period of adjustment when he got to the school.

“I had heard it was probably the number one academic school in the state at the time,” Proctor said. “When I made it there, I saw first hand that I would have to definitely have to put in a lot more time and effort into the school work. One thing that I can appreciate from the school is I left there with a sense of work ethic. That’s one thing I can appreciate Millsaps College for and transformed that from the academics into the work force.”

After Proctor left Millsaps College, he went into the United State Army Reserves where he advanced to the rank of E-7 Sergeant First Class. He currently works as a compliance auditor for Medtronic and lives in Memphis Tenn.

Another thing that Proctor appreciates is his up bringing. He was raised in a single parent home as his mother Ruthie Proctor worked two jobs to provide for him and his three brothers and three sisters.

“She instilled morals and values in all her children and ensured we had a solid religious foundation to build upon,” Proctor said in his speech. “If I was only half as strong as she, life wouldn’t be as hard sometimes.”

Proctor is also thankful for the support he has gotten from his brothers and sisters. His brother, Larry Proctor, became the male role model in his life.

According to Don, Larry got him to work harder on his game in junior high and that work ethic built as he advanced in his playing career.

“Larry made sure my friends and I had a gym to practice in,” Don said. “He spent countless hours working with me on my individual game.”

Don said Cleveland proved to be a great place to grow up in.

“I wouldn’t change where I was raised for anything in the world,” Don said. “Cleveland was a good environment to be raised in. You were safe in Cleveland at the time. There wasn’t a lot of crime there, and it was definitely a place you wanted to raise your family. I really appreciate the community and the environment.”