Cancer center receives donation
by Paisley Boston
Sep 20, 2013 | 939 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation recently received a generous donation from the Tallahatchie County Correctional Facility.

According to Freddie White-Johnson, founder and president of Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation, the money will be used to help build the resource center in Ruleville and aid low-income individuals in the Delta that are in need of mammograms.

"We have already begun utilizing the money. We’re also going to use the money to help individuals who have recently been diagnosed with cancer," she added.

Johnson said she was elated to have received the donation from the facility and all other donations from various sponsors.

"On behalf of the Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation and the University of Southern Mississippi, we would like to express our appreciation to all of our donors, but one in particular is the Tallahatchie County Correctional Facility. We are very thankful to Mr. Fred Figueroa, who saw the significance of the foundation and decided to donate," said Johnson.

She also said that the donation would be used to help recently diagnosed cancer patients with travel expenses and to purchase literature that can be passed out to churches or clinics in rural areas.

"Cancer literature is not free. The Foundation has to purchase enormous amounts of literature to pass out to local churches and sometimes to individuals in passing. The Foundation strives to aid less fortunate individuals in any and everyway possible. About 80 percent of our clients have a problem with paying for transportation to go to and from treatment centers. We step in and ensure that their transportation needs are met," she said.

According to Johnson, in 2012, the Foundation helped 423 women receive mammograms, and of the 423 women, 21 percent of them were diagnosed with breast cancer.

"We had a 62 year old patient who had never been to the doctor. A lot of women fail to get mammograms because they fear that the financial burden may fall on them or their family members. We try to help ease their worries by providing them with financial assistance, and by directing them to various agencies that will help with treatment and emotional counseling. Cancer not only affects the individual it affects the individual's entire family," said Johnson.

The Foundation will also host various events that will further assist them in the building of the resource center and continue facilitating the needs of its clients.

"We are hosting our annual delta-wide walk to fight and combat breast cancer on Oct. 19 at 8:30 a.m. in Greenwood The event is to take place at Amanda Elzy High School, and on-site registration is accepted," she said.

"Last year we had over 300 participants, but this year we plan to have more because we have gotten more sponsors and volunteers. One of our largest sponsors is Wal-Mart," said Johnson.

The Fannie Lou Cancer Foundation tries to empower the people, because we know that if people are not empowered then they won't become healthy. We also try to leave something tangible in the community," she added.

For more information about the Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation, visit www.flhcf.com