Supervisors meet with county mayors
by Paisley Boston
Sep 05, 2013 | 1571 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bolivar County Board of Supervisors met with mayors of Bolivar County. Pictured are (from left) Andrew Williams, Harvey Green, Levon Jackson, Lamar Franks, Donny Whitten, Donald Cooper, Preston Billings, Darryl Johnson and James McBride.
Bolivar County Board of Supervisors met with mayors of Bolivar County. Pictured are (from left) Andrew Williams, Harvey Green, Levon Jackson, Lamar Franks, Donny Whitten, Donald Cooper, Preston Billings, Darryl Johnson and James McBride.
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On Tuesday, the Bolivar County Board of Supervisors met at the Cleveland Courthouse Annex to discuss countywide improvements and to introduce newly elected and hired staff.

Supervisor James McBride introduced the newly elected mayors.

"We are here to assist you. We are not here to tell you what to do and how to do it in your town. That's your municipality," he said.

The mayors introduced were Donald Cooper, Boyle; Darryl Johnson, Mound Bayou; Levon Jackson, Pace; Harvey Green, Renova; Lamar Franks, Shaw; and Dan Harris, Shelby.

Members of the board of supervisors rendered a helping hand to the mayors by offering them future advice for budget control, if needed.

After his introduction, McBride added, "We're going to do all we can to make Bolivar County as comfortable as possible. We cannot fix every road in Bolivar County with yesterday's money but we will work closely with our mayors."

"I think the key thing is working together. We do want to help when we can, because this is a big county that we have to maintain and repair," added Supervisor Donny Whitten.

According to Supervisor Preston Billings, Harris of Shelby was absent due to an emergency that required his assistance.

Mayor Johnson of Mound Bayou expressed his gratitude by saying, "Mound Bayou is the greatest little town in Bolivar County. It is certainly the Jewel of the Delta.

"We are asking the board to help us with Mound Bayou. This past weekend, we had thousands of people coming into Mound Bayou for Septemberfest. It was a huge success."

Sheriff Kelvin Williams introduced the new warden, announced that the sheriff's department had found the vehicles they needed and expressed gratitude to the citizens of Bolivar County for helping them solve crimes.

"I would like to thank Sheriff Williams for giving me the opportunity. I am well-rounded and I look forward to moving the Bolivar County Regional Correctional Facility forward," said Ora Starks, the new warden.

Despite a recent rise in crime in Bolivar County, Williams said the crime rate has decreased at least 50 percent since he took office.

"Within two weeks, we've had two homicides. We're not a massive department but with the guys we have, we try to get the job done. Our first priority is the county.

"We have been able to get things done with the help of citizens. The key element to solving crimes is having witnesses,” he said.

“With the resources that we have, we are trying to be preventive. We ask the citizens to help us. They can call Crimestoppers and receive up to $1,000 for their cooperation, their identity will remain anonymous."

"When you hold back knowledge, that's a sin," said Billings. “Citizens of Bolivar County, please help Sheriff Williams to solve crimes. Our motto is, ‘We come together and we work together.’"

Bolivar County Emergency Management Association Director William Quinton presented an order to authorize the Bolivar County to do a joint Mitigation Plan with Mississippi Emergency Management Agency.

The order was approved and according to Quinton the mitigation plan costs around $3,000.

The purpose of mitigation planning is to identify policies and actions that can be implemented over a long term to reduce risk and future losses.

Mitigation plans for the foundation for a community's long-term strategy to reduce disaster losses and break the cycle of disaster damage, reconstruction and repeated damage.

It creates a framework for risk-based decision making to reduce damages to lives, property, and the economy from future disasters.

"If individuals do not have a mitigation plan, they will not receive any federal funds," said Quinton.