Marine parachutes in WWII style
by Paisley Boston
Aug 13, 2013 | 1812 views | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tommy Worthey attended the World War II Demonstration Team nine-day training camp, where he jumped from a C47 at 1,500 ft in the air.
Tommy Worthey attended the World War II Demonstration Team nine-day training camp, where he jumped from a C47 at 1,500 ft in the air.
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"The patriotic part caught my attention not just the jump", said Tommy Worthey of Cleveland, as he talked about his experience with the World War II Airborne Demonstration Team.

Worthey traveled to Frederick, Okla., on July 20 to take part in an experience formed to honor and serve the memory of the men and women who fought and died during WWII.

The group demonstrates this by parachute jumping in the style of WWII airborne soldiers utilizing an aircraft that actually participated in the invasion of Europe.

These activities serve to further the memory of their unbending loyalty to the cause of freedom.

"I got involved because my wife bought me an old jeep several years ago, it was used in World War II," said Worthey.

The restoration of the Jeep sparked Worthey’s interest and he subscribed to Supply Line magazine to feed his hunger for knowledge about his newly found treasure.

Supply Line is a magazine that is dedicated to providing an international organization for military vehicle enthusiast, historians, preservationist and collectors interested in the acquisition, restoration, preservation, safe operation and public education of historic military transport.

While browsing through a subscription of Supply Line, Worthey, who served in the Marines for seven years, came across an invitation to the WWII Airborne Demonstration Team.

While in the Marines, Worthey desired to become a paratrooper but he was unable to because he served in artillery.

"We practiced how to do the jumps until it became muscle memory. All the qualifications were the same as they would if you were Airborne. It is based on everything from WWII even the plane is a C47, which was used to carry paratroopers.

“I even got a chance to wear the same clothes as they wore back then," said Worthey.

The jump is typically made from about 1,500 ft. in the air and before an individual can make jump, he must qualify by making five jumps during the nine-day training period.

"I prayed from the time I got on the plane until I landed. Once you land, you're thankful to be on the ground," said Worthey.

He plans to return to the World War II Airborne Demonstration Team again in October.