Spreading the joy of Christmas
by Rory Doyle
Dec 12, 2012 | 2107 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Johnny Conguista and Tammy Rodgers of 1434 Memorial Dr. in Boyle have nearly 15,000 synchronized Christmas lights that flicker and fade in conjunction with classic holiday songs. Those passing by their house can tune the radio to 89.3 FM to listen to and watch the magic.
Johnny Conguista and Tammy Rodgers of 1434 Memorial Dr. in Boyle have nearly 15,000 synchronized Christmas lights that flicker and fade in conjunction with classic holiday songs. Those passing by their house can tune the radio to 89.3 FM to listen to and watch the magic.
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Christmas magic is everywhere — and it's especially alive at 1434 Memorial Drive in Boyle.

Johnny Conguista and fiancé Tammy Rodgers have spent months planning their unique Christmas decorations that are sure to catch the eyes and ears of those driving by their house.

The couple used computer software known as Light-O-Rama and ShowTime Director to link about 15,000 Christmas lights with classic holiday songs.

In a way, the lights "dance" by flickering and fading in synchronization with the beat and rhythm of the music as they illuminate a giant Christmas tree, snowman, angels, reindeer and more.

And you don’t have to get out of your car to hear the music from their doorstep speakers — tune the radio to 89.3 FM when driving by and you'll be able to watch and listen to the magic from the side of the road.

"We've seen people slam on their brakes and stop to take a look," said Conguista. "It's something a little different that catches peoples' attention."

The passionate decorators have been preparing the setup since October, but the hours of preparation were nothing but fun.

"I'm the biggest kid in the world," said Conguista. "Christmas is our favorite time of year and it's exciting putting it all together."

Rodgers said learning the software was intimidating but with a little research and practice she was able to master the sequencing.

"It can be overwhelming at first but Light-O-Rama is great software," Rodgers said. "Spend some time reading about it and most people can figure it out. The hardest part is setting up the decorations and plugging in all the extension cords."

The couple worked well together with Conguista doing the bulk of the lifting and building while Rodgers was responsible for the majority of the computer work.

"We could have the fanciest light and decoration show in the world but it wouldn't be possible without her computer knowledge," added Conguista.

They first learned about the software from a friend and knew they wanted to put all the pieces together this year.

"It's a little expensive and it's a big process but it's all worth it," said Rodgers. "Next year we're only going to get bigger and better."

Conguista said this year's setup features over three-dozen extension chords, two controller boxes and an electricity bill that he doesn't want to know.

"It really doesn't matter what the bill is — we do it for fun and for everyone else to enjoy," he said. "We're hoping to double the size of show next year or maybe even bigger."

And really that's what it's all about — spreading the Christmas joy through lights and music.

"If even just one person likes our show, it's worth all the time and every penny we've put into it," said Rodgers.